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Roth IRA

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Taxing Times

By | 2021, Money Matters, Newsletter | No Comments

It is that time of the year! Tax season is upon us. As you gather your tax documents together, you may be wondering how you are taxed on investments. This is a good time to review how taxes apply to different account types.

Tax-deferred

Most everyone has some type of tax-deferred account, generally thought of as a retirement account(s). Money is invested in these accounts before taxes are paid. It grows over the years and is taxed when you take it out of the account through withdrawals and distributions. These accounts include Individual Retirement Account (IRA), 401(k), 403(b), SIMPLE IRA, SEP IRA, etc. It can also include non-qualified tax-deferred annuities where the initial investment has been taxed, but the tax on the growth is deferred until you take a withdrawal from the account.

Money taken from tax-deferred accounts is taxed as ordinary income. That means it is taxed at your marginal-income tax rate.

Restrictions apply to these accounts. For instance, the amount of money you can invest each year is limited based on the account type and your age. If you take money out before you are age 59 ½, you will pay an early withdrawal penalty of 10%. Furthermore, you must begin taking money out of these accounts by age 72. This is known as a Required Minimum Distribution (RMD), and you will be subject to a penalty if you miss the deadline.

Taxable

Taxable investment accounts can be accessed at any time without restriction. They are often used to reach a specific goal or increase savings that will be used to supplement income during retirement. The initial investment has already been taxed, and you will only pay tax on the growth.

The tax rate is determined by the length of time you hold the investment. If you hold a specific investment within a taxable account for more than one year and one day, you will be taxed at lower capital gains rates. If you sell an investment in less than one year, taxes are calculated at your ordinary income-tax rate. Dividends received are generally taxed as ordinary income as well.

You can manage taxes within the account by offsetting gains and losses. This strategy can be helpful in reducing taxes.

You are free to add as much money as you want to a taxable account, and there are no requirements to take money out of this type of account regardless of your age.

Tax-free

Growing money without taxes is a wonderful way to plan for retirement. This can be done in a Roth IRA or Roth 401(k). Money is invested in the account after taxes have been paid. Any growth earned over the years is tax-free. It does not get better than that!

There are differences between the two types of Roth accounts. The amount of money you can contribute is limited by the type of account and your age. A Roth IRA has no required distribution date. You can leave the money in the account until you are ready to use it or pass it to your heirs tax-free. Unfortunately, the Roth 401(k) is subject to Required Minimum Distributions at age 72. This can be avoided by rolling the Roth 401(k) to a Roth IRA before the year you will turn 72.

For details on marginal tax rates, capital gains rates, and contribution limits, visit us at SmedleyFinancial.com and browse the updated 2021 tax information. You can also call us at 800-748-4788. Happy tax season!

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Investment Accounts for Children

By | 2021, Money Moxie, Newsletter | No Comments

Opening an investment account for a child is a great way to give them a financial head start. It also provides an excellent opportunity to teach a child the importance of saving and investing. Before you decide to contribute to an account for a loved one, make sure your own retirement goals are on track. I assure you, children prefer financially secure parents to gifts of money or financial inheritance.

Once you’ve decided you can afford to save for a child and still accomplish your own goals, the question becomes what type of account you should open. There are several options, each having benefits and drawbacks. I have provided a brief summary of some of the more popular account types below. Please reach out to us for more information before choosing which account is best for you.

Savings Account
This may be the best choice for short-term savings, but it is not usually recommended to fund expenses more than 24 months in the future. Savings accounts do not provide significant growth, offer tax benefits, or reduce the risk of inflation.

529 Plan
This is a great investment account if your goal is to fund qualified higher education and the beneficiary is still young. It is important to understand what constitutes qualified education, as not all education is qualified. Although this account can fund expenses at lower education levels, the benefits of a 529 plan increase the longer assets are in the account. All growth is tax-free, but taxes and penalties will apply to non-qualified expenses. The account owner can change the beneficiary of a 529 account.

UGMA/UTMA Account
These investment accounts are for minors. They offer flexibility, as money can be spent on anything that benefits the minor. Because the money placed in a UGMA/UTMA account is owned by the child, the earnings are generally taxed at the child’s tax rate. Those rates are usually lower than the benefactor’s rates and are often zero. When the child reaches the age of majority, the account must transfer to an individual investment account. At that time, the beneficiary gains full control and can use the funds however they choose.

Individual Investment Account
This account cannot be opened for a minor. It can be opened in the name of an adult with the intent to gift assets to a child at some point in the future. This account will never change ownership, and the account owner will always maintain control. All growth will be taxed at the account owner’s tax rate, and transfers of more than $15,000 per year to a single beneficiary may require filing a gift tax form, although gift tax may not be due.

Roth IRA for Minors
A Roth IRA may be opened for a child under the age of 18 if they have earned income. This account is a great way to jumpstart retirement for a minor. All growth is tax-free if used after the age of 59.5; otherwise, taxes and penalties may apply.

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Supersized Retirement Savings

By | 2020, Money Moxie, Newsletter | No Comments

If you want to supersize your retirement savings for early retirement or help you make up for lost time, consider a mega backdoor Roth. It can allow you to stash up to another $37,500 into retirement savings, which will grow tax-free. In an environment where taxes may go up because of government debt, this can be a very worthwhile proposition. It is especially beneficial for earners that make too much to contribute to a regular Roth or have too much in IRA assets to do a regular backdoor Roth. Of course, there are hurdles and restrictions.

The first hurdle is maxing out your 401(k) or Roth 401(k) contributions. In 2020, the limit is $19,500, or $26,000 if over age 50. If you aren’t contributing enough to hit these thresholds, then a mega backdoor Roth doesn’t apply. If you are hitting these thresholds, then your normal contributions should probably be pre-tax, and the backdoor Roth can serve as your after-tax savings. (It may not make sense to put all of your contributions into the Roth bucket if you are taxed at 37% federally.)

If you earn less than $124,000 or $196,000 filing jointly, then you are still eligible to contribute to your normal Roth IRA. Make that contribution first, which can be $6,000 or $7,000 if over age 50. If you earn more than the limits, then a mega backdoor Roth is your only retirement savings option.

The next big hurdle is your 401(k) plan. Only 43% of companies allow for after-tax contributions. In addition, the company 401(k) plan needs to allow for in-service distributions into the Roth. If the plan checks both of these boxes, then the contributions go into the after-tax portion, and the plan administrator can convert those assets into a Roth.

If the plan doesn’t allow for in-service distributions, then you can still put money in after-tax, but the earnings will only be tax-deferred. Usually at age 59½ or at retirement, you can place the after-tax portion into a Roth IRA, and the tax-deferred portion can go into a traditional IRA. This somewhat defeats the purpose as the goal is to get as much as possible into a Roth as soon as possible to allow for tax-free growth.

If you have jumped over these hurdles, then you are ready to stash money away. In 2020, you can put a maximum of $57,000 into a retirement plan, including your contributions and the company’s match. So, if you put in $19,500, and the company matches $5,500, then you can put in up to $32,000 more in the mega backdoor Roth. Talk about supersizing your retirement savings!

The major benefit of a mega backdoor Roth over a regular backdoor Roth conversion is not having to deal with the pro-rata rule. In a normal backdoor Roth, whatever you convert is proportionate across all of your IRAs. So, if you have any sizable amount in pre-tax IRA (i.e., traditional IRA), then you have to convert and pay taxes on the proportional amount converted from the IRA. Depending on the size of your IRA, and if you are under age 59½, this can really hurt. Since the mega backdoor Roth takes place in a 401(k), that pro-rata rule doesn’t apply.

While there are hurdles and restrictions, the mega backdoor Roth can be a great way to supersize your retirement savings. If you have any questions on how this can help you reach your goals, please contact our Private Wealth Managers.

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The Pendulum Swings

By | 2020, Executive Message, Money Moxie, Newsletter | No Comments

There is a giant pendulum that swings ever so slowly. When it gets to one extreme, the gravitational force pulls it back the other direction. Because of the Great Depression and World War II, the pendulum of national debt rose to an astounding 106% of GDP* in 1946.1 The pendulum took until 1974, or 28 years, to swing the other direction and get down to 23% of GDP.

With the back-to-back economic crises of the Great Recession in 2008 and COVID-19 in 2020, the debt to GDP ratio has swung dramatically back in the wrong direction. We now sit at 100% debt to GDP with a projection to get to 106% of GDP by 2023.2

What will be the long-term impact? Undoubtedly, taxes will go up. I recently heard it said, “The politicians that are telling you they can cut taxes are just bad at math.” If you look at history, tax rates shot up to 94% in 1944 for the highest tax bracket.3 That’s right, 94%! This was done with more marginal tax brackets. There were 24 brackets back then compared to just 7 today.

In 1965, the highest rate declined to 70%. It stayed around there until 1982 when the highest rate became 50%. Currently, our highest tax bracket is 37%.

I’m not a doomsday predictor. I don’t believe a new tax bracket will send rates up to 94%. However, I do worry about taxes going up for almost everyone. You can’t tax the “rich” enough to cover the current deficit and make the pendulum swing the other direction.

Thankfully, I believe there are prudent tools we can use to help protect you against future taxes. If you aren’t retired, you can contribute to a Roth IRA or Roth 401(k), depending on your income. If your income is below $139,000 (single) or $206,000 (married), consider a Roth conversion from your IRA or 401(k). If you are over age 70½, you can make tax free donations to a charity from your IRA.

These are just a few options to help protect against future taxes. For our clients, we will continue to review your personal financial plan to make sure you are prepared for the future regardless of what may come. If you want to schedule a review appointment, please contact us.

*GDP or Gross Domestic Product is the total output of the economy for one year. SFS and its representatives do not provide tax advice; it is important to coordinate with your tax advisor regarding your specific situation.
(1) https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/05/27/this-is-not-your-grandfathers-debt-problem/
(2) https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2020-debt-and-deficit-projections-hit-records/
(3) https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/IITTRHB

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