Women Should Save 2 Percent More Than Men

In an age where women have an increased influence in the workforce, it doesn’t seem right that women have to save more than men for retirement. However, that is what the research from Hewitt Associates suggests.

There are several contributing factors to this need, some inherent and some that can be corrected. An inherent factor for women is a longer lifespan—living an average of three years longer than men after retirement. The extra 2 percent is needed for the additional insurance cost for a longer life. The lower average yearly salary for women ($57,000) compared to a man’s ($84,000) indicates that a woman should save a higher percentage to match the dollar amount men save. Some correctable factors include: waiting longer to start saving for retirement, investing more conservatively, and not taking advantage of the company match in a 401(k).

Women are able to close the retirement gap by taking a few simple steps.

• Invest early and increase contribution rates. One goal should be to contribute 10-20 percent of gross income into a retirement account. This doesn’t have to be done at once; contributions can be marginally increased each year.

• Ask for advice. Many women feel insecure about managing finances. A wealth management professional can help determine personal risk tolerance and how aggressively to invest money.

• Leave a 401(k) invested. If suspending work due to family reasons, don’t cash out a 401(k)—this avoids taxes and hefty penalties. A 401(k) can be rolled-over into an IRA or professionally managed account.

• Put off retirement for a few years. This may be painful but could mean a great deal down the road. Don’t sacrifice the future for the present.

Women have several challenges that make retirement preparation more difficult. Recognizing these issues and making small changes in their saving and investing habits can have a significant impact.