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tax deductions

Tax Law Changes

By | 2019, Money Moxie, Newsletter | No Comments

The first significant tax reform in over three decades was put into action for 2018. Now we get to see the real impact of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act as people start to file their 2018 tax return.

Whether you are filing your tax return or you want to make sure you give your accountant the best information possible, here are the major changes to which you should pay attention.

Form 1040 significantly shortened and simplified
One of the major goals for this tax reform was to “simplify” taxes. The immediate impact is that the old Form 1040 will be shrunken down to a half page on front and back. Now there will only be 23 lines compared to the daunting 79 lines on the old 1040. There will no longer be a form 1040A or 1040EZ as those were just an attempt to simplify an overly complex 1040. The new 1040 will be accompanied by 6 schedules.

If this shortened version makes you feel like attempting to do your taxes for the first time in a while, you should probably still take them to your accountant as there are so many tax changes that you really need an expert that knows how all of the changes will impact you. If you have been filing your own taxes, they should be easier this year (should being the keyword).

Tax brackets
Tax brackets have been reduced, which should benefit almost all people. Tax brackets are based on your total amount of taxable income, not adjusted gross income.

For example, if a couple’s joint taxable income was $75,000 in 2017, they were in the 15-percent bracket and in 2018 will be in the 12-percent bracket. The 25-percent bracket has been reduced to 22 percent.

Changes to the standard deduction and exemptions
The most significant changes for individuals happened to the standard and itemized deductions. With the changes, it is estimated that 80-90 percent of people will now take the standard deduction. However, don’t throw out your box of medical receipts yet. You still need to make sure itemizing is no longer a benefit for you.

The standard deduction limit has been raised from $6,350 to $12,000 for single filers and from $12,700 to $24,000 for married filers. They also did away with personal exemptions that were $4,050 per person, but offset that loss for families with children by increasing the child tax credit from $1,000 to $2,000 per child. There is also an extra deduction of $1,600 for single filers and $2,600 for married filers if you are over age 65. (For a more complete list, please visit:
smedleyfinancial.com/financial/2019-key-numbers.php.)

Specific changes to itemized deductions
State and local tax deduction has been limited to $10,000. You can still deduct medical expenses that exceed 7.5 percent of your adjusted gross income, and that limit will be going up to 10 percent in 2019.

Mortgage interest can be deducted up to a principal value of $750,000 if the loan originated in 2017 or later. Older loans will be grandfathered in and interest is deductible up to a principal limit of $1,000,000. Mortgage equity loans will only be deductible if the proceeds were used for home improvement. (Say goodbye to consolidating debt into a home equity loan and deducting it.)

This major overhaul to the tax system should simplify taxes and should make it so most people take the standard deduction. Most people should also end up paying a little less in taxes, which is always nice.

Let’s look at an example
In 2017, Jay and Mary filed a joint tax return. They are both age 55 and they don’t have any dependents. They had $18,000 in itemized deductions. Add to this their personal exemption of $4,050 each, totaling $26,100 in deductions. In 2018, they will only get the standard deduction of $24,000 with no personal exemptions and may owe more in taxes. The saving grace for Jay and Mary is that their tax bracket was reduced and may make up for the reduction in deductions.

SFS and its representatives do not provide tax advice; it is important to coordinate with your tax advisor regarding your specific situation.

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You Can Contribute More to Your Retirement in 2019

By | 2018, Money Moxie, Newsletter | No Comments

Good news is coming for those looking to max out their retirement plans. In 2019, the contribution limits will be raised on most retirement accounts. This opens the door to higher tax deductions, more tax-deferred growth, and better savings ratios.

Employee contribution limits for the 401(k), 403(b), and 457 plans will be raised to $19,000 annually. For those individuals age 50 and older, an extra $6,000 contribution is allowed. The ceiling on SIMPLEs climbs to $13,000 with an additional $3,000 for those 50 and older. Both traditional IRAs and Roth IRAs will jump to a $6,000 annual limit with a $1,000 extra contribution for those born before 1970.

Deduction phaseouts for traditional IRAs of active plan participants will also start at higher levels in 2019, from adjusted gross incomes of $103,000 – $123,000 for married couples filing jointly and $64,000 – $74,000 for single filers. Roth IRA AGI phaseouts will increase to $193,000 – $203,000 for couples and $122,000 – $137,000 for individuals.

If you have questions about how these changes can impact your financial plan, please call us to schedule a review with one of our Wealth Managers.

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