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Sharla J Jessop CFP

Get in the Right Lane

By | 2019, Money Matters, Newsletter | No Comments

Missing a freeway exit can be extremely aggravating. Once missed, you are required to drive farther away from your destination. It can happen for many reasons; being in the wrong lane, missing an exit sign, or heavy traffic preventing you from getting over. Once you realize you have missed the exit, you immediately begin making corrections so you can exit at the next opportunity.

Financial success can be like the freeway. You may be headed in the right direction, but are you making the right decisions? Here are some behaviors that may keep you from reaching your financial destination:

  1. Spending more than your planned budget. One of the greatest concerns of retirees is running out of money. The goal of a financial plan is to make sure your money lasts as long as you do, even if you live to 100. If you are depleting your nest egg too quickly, you should change lanes. 

  2. Giving money to kids. When adult children are having financial troubles, giving them money may seem like the right thing to do. That is not the case. In most situations, it just prolongs the problem. If you are bailing out your adult children, you should change lanes.

  3. Paying for things you don’t use. This could be a gym membership, a storage unit to hold more stuff, or the RV and toys that rarely get used. Letting go of these things has financial and psychological benefits. You no longer worry that these items are going unused. You can rent an RV for a vacation if you want, and most of the stuff you are storing is of higher value to you than it may be to your kids. Ask them what they would like to have and get rid of the rest. It’s refreshing! If you are paying for things you don’t need, you should change lanes.

Look at your financial goals. Are you on target to reach your financial destination? If not, I challenge you to make a lane change – make the needed corrections and continue to move forward. Don’t let anything keep you from reaching your financial destination. Having a plan can keep you headed in the right direction and the right lane.

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Women Face Unique Challenges. Good Decisions are Essential.

By | 2019, Executive Message, Money Matters, Newsletter | No Comments

This year marked the 4th anniversary of our Just for Women conference and the launch of Smedley Financial’s Just for Women community. Hooray!

We want to thank the women who have participated in our community. Together, we have created a meaningful experience that engages, empowers, and educates women of all ages and from all social and economic backgrounds.

Women face many unique challenges when it comes to financial security: longer life expectancies; the likelihood that they will be in the driver’s seat, financially speaking; reduced pension payouts and retirement account balances due to periods away from the workforce to raise children or care for an aging parent. This reality makes it even more important that they set precedence regarding finances. Women should become more educated, build financial confidence, and most importantly–make good financial decisions.

Good decision-making will have a more significant impact on financial success than skill and talent combined, regardless of your gender. Dalbar, an independent research firm, has confirmed this. Their 25 years of research has found that investors’ performance has suffered significantly due to poor decision-making. Decisions which have been emotionally based or made in the “heat of the moment” tend to end with poor results.

This issue recaps some of the highlights of our Just for Women conference. If you were not able to attend, please make it a priority to join us next year — mark your calendar for May 8, 2020. Hopefully, our women’s community will help ignite a financial passion in everyone who participates.

If you would like to receive our Just for Women – Money Matters email, send us a request at [email protected] Provide your name and email, and we’ll make sure you receive the next issue.

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Is Your Brain Risking Your Financial Success?

By | 2019, Newsletter | No Comments

The world is full of information, yet our brains are only capable of processing a certain amount. If we had to analyze every aspect of every situation or decision, we would never get anything done. In order to cope, our brains have created shortcuts to help us make sense of things. These cognitive shortcuts – known as heuristics – are rules of thumb or educated guesses. In many cases, being approximately right is good enough. However, there are times when these shortcuts are not good. Recognizing when they are creeping into our decision-making will help us determine if they are helpful or hurtful in our current situation. This is critical when it comes to your money.

Overconfidence

While confidence is good, overconfidence exaggerates our abilities and can cause us to underestimate the risk of being wrong. For example, you may pick a stock that is growing. If the stock price continues to go up, you conclude that you have a good strategy or a natural talent. However, when the stock plummets, you distance yourself from the truth, believing it was just bad luck. An overconfident person may even repeat the same mistake over and over again.

Framing

When we have already made up our minds, we place our existing perspective on all new information that comes our way. For example, expecting a drop in the stock market, you put a negative spin on any good news. People who frame eventually get a big surprise when they find out the cost of being wrong.

Anchoring

Every one of us has experiences that form our opinions. When we anchor ourselves to these opinions, we ignore anything that doesn’t fit our views. If you lost money investing in a recession, you might conclude that the stock market is too risky. Even when presented with a better perspective of its potential growth, you may still feel like there is too much risk.

Herding

Have you ever found yourself doing something you would not do on your own? Going along with what a larger group is doing, whether those actions are rational or not, even in the face of unfavorable outcomes is known as herding. You hear that investors are selling, so you sell, or you hear they are buying, so you buy more without considering how it impacts your financial plan.

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Your Values Matter

By | 2019, Money Matters | No Comments

When it comes to money, your values matter, why? If what you value most and your goals are not in alignment, you will experience a state of financial and emotional conflict. Your ideals and your actions will not match up, making it difficult to reach your goals.

Here’s an example of a value and a goal that would be in alignment. If family is important to you, then you value time spent together and want to take care of them. Your goal would be to protect your family financially if something should happen to you. Your actions might be to provide money to cover debts, pay for children’s college, replace your income, and provide end of life care. You would make saving for emergencies and retirement a priority, so you are prepared to live a dignified retirement, you would have legal documents and beneficiary designation in good order to protect your loved ones.

There is no right or wrong answer when it comes to personal values. They can be anything from Family, to Independence, to Education. There is no prerequisite to what you value; it is the culmination of your life experiences, education, and beliefs. The trick is which values are most important.

What are your top 5 values? You may be able to name two or three right off. Then you may go into a stupor, wondering “What else do I value”? Sometimes it is not easy to identify our top 5; it takes time and thought. If you find yourself stumped let me know; I can help.

Your decisions and actions have the most significant impact when it comes to reaching your goals. They have more to do with your financial success than the market or the investments you choose.

That’s why your values matter!

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How Emotion Drives Your Money

By | 2019, Money Moxie, Newsletter | No Comments

Emotional Response

Financial advertisements make inflammatory statements such as “You cannot afford losses like those of the last recession” or “Making the wrong Social Security decision can cost you thousands.” These advertisers want to make us feel that we need to make changes without considering the reality of our situation.

Everything we hear or see causes an emotional reaction; good or bad. Information we hear or see hits the amygdala, the center of emotion in our brain within 12 milliseconds.

Logical Response

It takes 40 milliseconds for the same information to hit the logical part of our brain, the cortex.

By that time our emotions have hijacked our brain, and we cannot think straight. There literally is no time for rational thinking. Our minds were made up before we even realized what was happening.

Finding a Solution

Next time you find your logic being hijacked by emotion, take a step back. Think to yourself: “What if the situation I am fearing does not happen?” “What if the opposite happens and things are better than I think?”

Your financial plan is the tool we use to prepare you for market volatility and prevent emotional decisions from sidetracking you from your important financial goals. If you do not have a plan or have not recently reviewed your plan, I invite you to meet with one of our financial advisors.

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Preparing 2018 Taxes

By | 2019, Money Moxie, Newsletter | No Comments

Tax reporting documents
While you may be anxious to get your taxes done, you can avoid filing amended returns by assuring you have all final tax documents to provide to your tax preparer.

Most 1099 tax forms will be available between January 27th and February 16th.

If you have an account with National Financial Services, please be aware of the following timelines for receiving your tax documents.

Some securities companies may not deliver National Financial Services with final tax information by the first mailing date. In this case, you will not receive a 1099 until the final information is available. A preliminary tax statement will be available online only. This will not be reported to the IRS and cannot be used for filing purposes.

All 1099s will be available online and mailed no later than March 8th.

If you have signed up to receive electronic documents, you can access the tax documents through your Wealthscape access. If you signed up to receive tax documents electronically only, you will not receive them in the mail.

Qualified Charitable Distributions (QCD)
If you made a qualified charitable distribution from your IRA during 2018, please let your tax preparer know. Your 1099R form should indicate that the taxable amount is undetermined by a checked box in 2b “Taxable amount not determined.”

You will also need to provide documentation from the charity that your donation was received. This should not count as income for tax purposes and should not be an itemized deduction.

Consult your tax advisor for further information regarding the preparation of your taxes. If you have questions regarding the delivery of your tax documents, please contact our office at 801-355-8888.

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An unexpectant caregiver

By | 2019, Money Matters, Newsletter | No Comments

As we welcome in the New Year, I want to give you some food for thought. New Year’s resolutions come and go – some fulfilled, some forgotten. What if you can do one thing in 2019 that will benefit you and those you love? Would you take the time to consider it?

I want to share the recent experience of a close family member of mine. This woman is kind, loving, and if it were in her power, would do anything for anyone – especially those in her family.

Unexpectedly, this woman found herself in the role of primary caregiver to her single sister. Her sister had been financially self-reliant and remarkably independent throughout her life. She was diligent in putting money aside from her earnings to help supplement her income during retirement. What she didn’t plan on were unforeseen medical events that left her completely dependent on the help and support of others.

After many months of cancer treatments, she experienced a stroke, which severely limited her mobility and slowed her speech, leaving her dependent on others for her care. Luckily, she had an older sister who stepped up and took over. Unfortunately, there were no legal documents granting anyone access to medical information, financial information, or allowing them to make decisions on her behalf.

As you can imagine, this created many difficult hurdles. Not only were there medical treatments that needed to be coordinated, there was also the issue of what insurance was available to cover the numerous hospital visits and the ensuing stays in rehab and care facilities. Add to that the dilemma of what money was available to pay for coinsurance, deductibles, and prescriptions. And what about her ongoing bills at home, how would they be paid? It was an unbelievable challenge. It took time, patience, and a great emotional toll.

This situation is not uncommon. We see it all too often. We believe that if we plan financially for the future, everything will be okay. In some cases that is true. What most of us tend to overlook is the emotional impact on those who would so willingly step up to take care of us should the need be presented. Instead of planning for the unforeseen, we unwittingly tie their hands and create unnecessary emotional stress on those we love. Waiting until next week, next month, or next year may be too late. Do it now! Make it a priority for the new year. Take the time to meet with your financial advisor and an estate planning attorney. Create the documents that will minimize the burden on those you love.

Estate planning documents generally include: Will, Trust, Medical Power-of-Attorney, Medical Directive, and Durable Power-of-Attorney. Depending on the complexity of your situation and what you are trying to accomplish, other documents may be needed. An attorney can advise you on the right documents for your personal situation.

Wishing you a healthy, happy, and prosperous New Year!

 

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Why You Should Care About The Fiduciary Standard

By | 2016, Money Moxie, Newsletter | No Comments

There has been a great deal of media attention surrounding the Department of Labor’s (DOL) recent ruling regarding the “Fiduciary Standard,” and with good reason. Tony Robbins, self-help author and motivational speaker, recently asked random people walking down Wall Street, “What is a fiduciary?” With the exception of one individual, the answer was, “I don’t know.”

This made me wonder – Do our clients understand the benefits of working with a fiduciary?

When Smedley Financial Services, Inc.® began back in 1982 as a registered investment advisor, we became a fiduciary. We have always believed that putting our clients’ interests before our own is the best way to create a lasting partnership with the people we serve.

fiduciary standard

What is the Fiduciary Standard?
The Fiduciary Standard requires that we avoid conflicts of interest. Our recommendations must meet your needs and be in your best interest.

In contrast, financial professionals such as brokers, insurance salespersons, and other advisors operating under the “suitability standard” are merely required to ensure an investment is suitable for a client when purchased. There is little obligation to offer a better investment nor a requirement to monitor those investments in the future.

Why the big concern?
As company pension plans have diminished, Americans now must set aside more of their income to help supplement their own retirement income. This can be a daunting, time consuming task.

At the same time, the retirement investment landscape has only grown more complicated. Lack of investor savvy and awareness regarding retirement account types, not to mention the emerging number of investments available within those accounts, has led investors to rely on the counsel of professionals.

Unfortunately, not all professionals are alike. The new DOL rule seeks to level the playing field, requiring all financial professionals to follow the new Fiduciary Standard. Isn’t it sad that a law must be put in place forcing financial professionals to do the right thing?

Will the rule protect investors?
The new DOL rule will require more work for financial professionals, but hopefully it will also protect investors saving for retirement.

The DOL also states that cheaper is not always better. Price cannot be the only determining factor when making a decision, especially one as important as your financial future.

Consider what you are getting for the fee you are paying. Does your fee include an advisor that will help you determine your financial goals, prioritize those goals, and design a plan to help reach your goals? Will you get ongoing monitoring of your goals and the investments you are making? What if something changes? Who will be there to help address the changes in your life that may impact your financial destiny? What will happen during periods of increased market volatility and who will help you determine if your investments are too aggressive or too conservative?

These are just a few of the concerns that must be considered, but are often overlooked when the primary focus is having lower fees.

You are our primary concern. We invite you to call or come in and sit down with us anytime you have questions. We welcome your call.

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Americans Are Taking Control of Their Money

By | 2016, Money Moxie, Newsletter | No Comments

Do you remember what America was like in 2006? If we could give the year a financial theme, I would label it, “Borrow and Spend!” Buying a home was easy; no verification of employment and no down payment were necessary. An interest-only loan could be obtained without any reasonable expectation of one’s ability to repay the loan.

As a matter of fact, you could borrow up to one-hundred percent of a home’s value, skip a month’s payment, and even cash out any value that had come from the rising price of the home. Leverage was the hot financial fad! Many Americans borrowed as much as they could and bought whatever they wanted!

money

What a difference ten years can make. Contrast 2006 with 2016; today people are taking control of their financial situations, putting themselves in the driver’s seat, and keeping their own hands on the steering wheel. Financial responsibility is much more prevalent.

Disposable income —the money we have left to spend after taxes have been paid—has increased at an average rate of just less than one percent per year over the past ten years. So income is up a little. This makes the fact that personal saving is up very impressive. We have seen the personal savings rate increase from 3 percent at the end of 2005 to 5.5 percent at the end of 2015.

This significant improvement demonstrates a shift for Americans towards greater financial strength. Here are some of the positive outcomes.Americans saving

Reduction in personal debt
Still smarting from the financial pinch of the last recession, cash flow is now king. For many of us the perception of acceptable levels of debt has changed significantly. Debt is financial fragility, which is why Americans again recognize the value of getting out of debt as quickly as possible. Many have taken advantage of low-interest rates and refinanced to shorter-term loans. Paying off short-term loans such as car loans and signature loans is now a priority, and the use of credit card debt has reduced significantly.

Spending less
Knowing what we should do and putting it into practice can be challenging. This is especially true when it comes to living within your means. However, it is possible and it is powerful. No other financial habit is more important!

We have had the opportunity to meet with many people that have adopted the philosophy of a simpler lifestyle. This allows them to enjoy what they have without the pressure to get more “stuff” and then live with the financial burden. Managing spending also impacts our future lifestyle. If we spend everything today…what will we live on in retirement?

Increased accessible savings
After experiencing financial instability, many people have gained a witness of the need for liquidity. Access to emergency money to cover needs for 3 to 6 months has been widely recommended for decades, but it has gained new favor in the last 10 years. The wisdom of this applies beyond those still working. Retirees are also paying attention to liquid savings to make sure they can cover the unexpected emergencies that will surely come.

Focus on planning for the future
A shift has taken place in young people as well. They are saving for their futures at the beginning of their careers. Company-sponsored retirement plans such as 401(k) or 403(b), as well as individual IRA or Roth IRA, are now common to this young generation and they are off to a strong start.

Financial Health

Those who see retirement on the horizon have a new goal. They want to maintain a comfortable lifestyle throughout their retirement years. With fewer pension plans providing retirement income, the burden to provide income during retirement has been shifted to them. Many have hit the ceiling on contributing to their retirement plans and are using additional savings to help them reach their goals.

It is clear that over time all things can change; the market, our spending and savings habits, even our perception of what’s important financially. We have learned many valuable lessons and have made significant strides to improve our financial situations. The next ten years will undoubtedly bring more changes; some will be good and some will be bad. Remember to prepare when times are good and don’t fall prey to the next financial fad. Keep in mind that you are in the driver’s seat.

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