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Jordan R. Hadfield Archives -

What is the Risk of being too Conservative

By | 2018, Money Moxie | No Comments

Are your conservative investments at risk? What about the cash you are keeping in your savings account or in the safe downstairs? “No,” you might be thinking, “I keep cash because it’s safe.” If these are your thoughts, I have some bad news. In an effort to avoid risk, you could be taking on a different kind of risk. I’m talking about inflation risk and it’s a silent killer that preys on the innocent.

Inflation can cause damage too small to be seen until it’s too large to be avoided. And the more conservative the investment, the greater the risk. “But wait,” you might be saying, “I thought conservative investments were safer and risk increased only as I invested more aggressively.” That is generally true with market risk, but it does change when considering inflation risk.

According to inflationdata.com, inflation has historically averaged just over 3%. This means on average a dollar will buy 3% less than it did 12 months earlier. A product that costs $100 dollars today will cost over $2,000 dollars 100 years from now. When my father was young, a candy bar cost 5 cents. I remember paying 50 cents as a child. Today, a candy bar is $1.25. That’s inflation.

If our money is not earning at least the rate of annual inflation, our purchasing power is decreasing. My father could’ve bought almost 20 candy bars with a dollar when he was young. With the same dollar, a child today couldn’t even buy one.

As you can see in the Risk vs. Reward graph I’ve provided, the more aggressive the investment, the greater the potential should be for gain, especially over long periods of time. However, I want to call your attention to the left side of the graph, the conservative side. This side of the graph shows little to no risk being taken and yet there is a loss. That is the risk of being too conservative. This loss isn’t a loss of principal, but a loss of purchasing power.

Keeping up with inflation should be an investor’s number one goal, and some conservative investments struggle to do that. Conservative investments do serve an important purpose and are a great choice for short term goals and emergency funds. But if your goal is long-term, adding a little more risk may actually reduce inflation risk. Investing in a diversified portfolio that includes stock market and bond market risk may help protect you from inflation risk.

A real area of concern for inflation risk is in retirement. If these investors don’t keep up with inflation, they could risk living longer than their money. At a 3.5% inflation rate, the cost of goods will double every 20 years. This means an 85 year-old couple who keep their investments in cash will have half the purchasing power they did when they retired at 65. Although the principal amount would be the same, it would be like a 50% loss. That is a risk I hate to see investors take.

For more information on inflation risk, market risk, and the risks taken in your current portfolio, please call us and schedule an appointment. We would love to answer any questions you have and help you to reduce unnecessary risk.

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Smedley Financial’s New Advisors

By | 2018, Money Moxie, Newsletter | No Comments

We are pleased to introduce two new advisors at Smedley Financial, Jordan Hadfield, and Leah Nelson. In our search for new advisors, we focused on people who had an in-depth education in all facets of financial planning and advising and demonstrated a high level of integrity. We were fortunate to find two amazing individuals with these sought-after qualities. If you have not had the opportunity to meet them yet, we hope you will over the next several months.

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Jordan Hadfield

On May 27th, 2012, I climbed into the right seat of a small aircraft next to a student pilot and took off down the runway. I was flying a Diamond DA20, and this trip was taking me from Provo to Lake Havasu to Catalina Island then up the coast to San Francisco and over to Lake Tahoe before heading back home. We flew low and slow, trying to take in the changing scenery and beautiful landscapes.

I was well on my way to becoming a professional pilot and hoped to land a full-time job flying very soon. That plan changed when I met my beautiful wife and realized a career in aviation would require constantly flying away from what matters most to me, my family. I now have two amazing boys and a little girl who rule my world. I have a bachelor’s degree in Personal Financial Planning from Utah Valley University and I am working towards my Certified Financial Planner® designation. Although I miss flying, I couldn’t be happier with what I’m doing now.

I used to chart my way across the United States and experience the freedom of flying. I now chart investments and retirement accounts to bring financial freedom to others. I find both activities to be exciting, but the latter gives me a sense of gratification that flying never did. I’m also a drummer. I love photography. And I work as a professional skydiver.

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Leah Nelson

For my whole life, I have watched many people around me struggle and make bad financial decisions. Seeing this inspired me to make the decision to become a financial advisor.

I graduated from Utah Valley University with a bachelor’s degree in Personal Financial Planning and successfully passed my Certified Financial Planner® (CFP®) exam.

I want to be on the client’s side helping them make good financial decisions to lessen the stress they feel because of their finances. I have always had a desire to serve people, and I’m glad I’ve chosen the financial services industry to help people reach some of their most important life goals.

In my free time, I am involved in musical theater. Music is one of my favorite things, and I enjoy passing the time by playing the piano, ukulele, or singing. I also love traveling. I’m lucky to have a sister that is willing to be my travel buddy! I love spending time with my family as well. They are fun to be around, and I love seeing what silly thing my nephew will do next. I am so excited to be part of Smedley Financial!

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Just for Women – Raising Financially Aware Children

By | 2018, Money Moxie | No Comments

Being financially savvy has a massive impact on our lives, as well as those of our children and grandchildren. Kelly Ness, of American Century Investments, focused on improving our family’s finances.

The principles of financial responsibility are not well taught in schools. According to a recent study, high school children claim 88% of their financial education came from their parents.

Where do children learn money management? Statistically, children are far more likely to be savers than spenders if their parents or grandparents talk to them about money. So, what should we say?

First, we need to understand our own money habits. Which behaviors do we want our children to replicate? Which should they not follow?

Next, we need to open a dialogue. Discuss saving, investing, debt dangers, and charitable gifting. It is also important to be open about household income and budgeting. In this way, they can learn from real and personal experience.

An allowance is a great way for young children to learn. Kids who receive an allowance tend to save more than those who do not. Children should also have financial goals. This can be a great opportunity to teach them about working for income and saving for purchases. When it comes time to buy, they will have an understanding of its worth.

Creating the time to teach your children or grandchildren about financial responsibility will pay dividends. It’s never too early, or too late. Bring your older children or grandchildren to your next appointment at SFS and allow them to ask questions. This will help to reinforce the value of planning, investing, and saving for the future. If you have questions regarding family financial education, please reach out to us. We would love to help you help them.

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Stocks Stand Alone

By | 2018, Money Moxie | No Comments

If you could go back in time 100 years and pick an asset in which to invest, which would you choose? Knowing of events like the Wall Street Crash of 1929 and the Great Depression, 7% inflation in the 1970’s, and the stock market crash of 2008, would you still choose to put your money in stocks? If so, you would be making a wise decision.

I recently came across an article posted in the March 2018 issue of The Wall Street Journal regarding the average annual returns of 10 popular investments over the last century. (I included a graph showing these investments and their average historical returns above inflation.)

At first glance, I noticed the negative returns of diamonds. Although diamonds are quite popular, especially on the finger of a loved one, they have been a poor investment if appreciation is the goal.

Bonds, which happen to be fifth on the list behind collectable stamps and high-end violins, show an average annual return of 2%.

Gold, a popular investment among some investors, has historically fallen short when compared to fine art and fine wine; the latter of which post returns over 500% more than that of gold.

Stocks have had the highest returns, and by a large margin. Despite the crashes, recessions, and economic contractions, stocks have had the best return in the last 117 years.

As we face volatility in the markets in 2018, we know that a diversified portfolio of stocks and bonds has weathered the storms of years past.

Despite the risks of recession and downturn in the future, I plan to keep my diamonds on my wife’s finger and my long-term investments in stocks.

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