was successfully added to your cart.

Tag

IRA Archives -

2017 Tax Update

By | 2017, Money Moxie, Newsletter | No Comments

2017 Tax Deadline: April 18th
For you procrastinators, there is some good news regarding taxes this year: the tax filing deadline has been moved back to April 18th because the 15th falls on a Saturday and Monday the 17th is a holiday in the District of Columbia. However, you should not wait until the bitter end.

Even if you have to pay, we recommend submitting your return a week in advance just to avoid any possible issues. If you are due a refund, why wait? Get your money now! If you have more questions about tax brackets or other important numbers, please check out our website.

IRA/Roth IRA Contributions
Don’t rob from your future self. Make a payment to your future security. As with taxes, you also have until April 18th to make contributions into your IRA or Roth IRA. (But don’t wait that long or you risk missing the deadline!) Remember that IRA contributions lower your current taxes. They make sense if you are in a high tax bracket now and you will be in a lower one at retirement.

Roth contributions do not lower your current taxes, but they do grow tax free. If you are currently in a low tax bracket and will be in a higher one at retirement, or if you are a long way from retirement, then Roth contributions may be the best option for you.

You can contribute $5,500 total per person to an IRA or Roth. If you are over age 50, you can make a catch-up contribution of $1,000 for a total of $6,500 per year.

If you are eligible for a 401(k) through work and if your income exceeds a certain amount, your ability to deduct IRA contributions or make Roth contributions may be limited. Please consult with your CPA or check out our website to get more information regarding the phase-out limits.

Tax Forms
All of the tax forms have been mailed out, including the delayed tax reporting on non-retirement accounts. We are sorry (especially to the accountants) that the IRS has allowed delays in order for reporting companies to provide more accurate information.

If you still haven’t seen your tax forms, log in to your myStreetscape account and download the forms under the documents section. If you do not have a login, go to www.mystreetscape.com and click “register.” Then follow the prompts to create an account. You can use the same myStreetscape login to go paperless for the future.

In April, myStreetscape is being renamed to Wealthscape. You will be able to use the same login credentials after the transition.

Qualified Charitable Distributions
We’ve had several questions, from clients and accountants, regarding Qualified Charitable Distributions (QCD) that were sent directly to charities.
A quick recap: If you are over 70 ½ years old, a QCD allows you to donate part or all of your Required Minimum Distribution (RMD) to a charity and avoid paying tax on it.

The 1099-R’s sent by National Financial Services (NFS) show the total amount of distributions and are not reduced by the amount of the QCD. So, the tax preparer should reduce the amount reported on the 1099 by the amount of the QCD to come up with the taxable amount of IRA distributions.

The QCD should NOT be included as an itemized deduction. The potential benefit of the QCD is to remove the IRA distribution from your income, which may lessen the amount of Social Security subject to tax or help you avoid Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT). Smedley Financial does not give tax advice. Please consult a qualified CPA to get additional detail.

Source: http://www.smedleyfinancial.com/financial/2017-key-numbers.php. Tax advice is not provided by Securities America representatives; therefore it is important to coordinate with your tax advisor regarding your specific situation.

Tags: , , , , ,

IRA Rollover versus 401(k)

By | 2015, Money Moxie | No Comments

Money BrainIf you have ever left a 401(k) at a previous job, you are probably wondering what you should do with your money. If you have over a certain amount, many 401(k)s will allow you to leave the money there or you could roll the money over to an IRA. Below is a list of seven questions you should ask yourself to determine where your money should be.

1. Do you want to be the financial advisor on your account?
Do you feel comfortable answering these questions: Am I saving enough? Am I taking the appropriate amount of risk for my age and time horizon? Which investments should I hold? How do I make my money last for all of my retirement? If you already know the answers to those questions and are competent at deciding the asset allocation of your 401(k), then your current 401(k) may be sufficient. If you don’t know the answers to those questions, then you may want to roll out your 401(k) into an IRA at Smedley Financial where we can help answer these important questions.

2. How much do I value regular feedback and personalized advice?
Most 401(k) plans are limited in the advice they can render because of fiduciary liability. If you have ever asked a 401(k) advisor where you should invest your money, you may have received a response like: “Where you feel comfortable.” 401(k)s also can’t handle non-retirement investments, real estate, or life insurance. In addition, 401(k) advisors are typically servicing too many participants to provide personalized advice. Seek out a private wealth manager, like those here at SFS, that can advise you on your whole financial situation and align your investments with your goals and values.

3. Is the investment choice important?
Many 401(k)s offer a limited number of investment choices, typically 10 to 20. They may be lacking the ability to diversify into many other investment options that could boost return or diversify risk. IRAs tend to offer a much broader choice of investment selections. For example, our brokerage account has access to over 3,000 different investments. Review the investment options available and determine if they allow for appropriate diversification and if they have had good investment performance in relation to their benchmarks.

4. Do I understand how to compare fees and expenses?
Thanks to recent laws, 401(k)s are now required to disclose their annual fees, which makes this comparison easier. Compare the fees for the 401(k) and the IRA by looking at the total fee and what services are provided for that fee.

5. Am I between ages 55 and 59½?
For employees that separate service between the ages of 55 and 59½, some 401(k)s allow penalty-free withdrawals. IRAs on the other hand only allow penalty-free withdrawals after the age of 59½. Determine when you may need your 401(k)/IRA money and whether you have other sources that can bridge the gap between retirement at an earlier age and age 59½.

6. Am I concerned about creditor protection?
Both 401(k)s and IRAs generally offer substantial credit protection. 401(k)s are typically excluded entirely from bankruptcy proceedings while IRAs are typically excluded up to a maximum of $1 million. Check with your state to verify any state specific rules.

7. Do I own employer stock in my 401(k) plan?
Before cashing out your company stock in your 401(k), consult with a tax advisor to determine if a tax strategy called Net Unrealized Appreciation could benefit you. Depending on your individual circumstance, the company stock may be taxed at a lower rate. Once company stock is transferred to an IRA, it is treated like the rest of the IRA money and is taxed as ordinary income when it is withdrawn.

Before making these or any important financial decisions, talk to the Wealth Management Consultants at Smedley Financial so they can help you reach your goals.

Tags: , , , , , ,

IRA Charitable Distributions Are Back!

By | 2013, Money Moxie, Newsletter | No Comments

For those of you over age 70 ½, a very beneficial tax law is back in the books thanks to the agreement reached by Congress on January 1, 2013. The tax break allows you to donate IRA money directly to a charity and avoid paying any tax on the distribution. Even better, the distribution still counts toward your Required Minimum Distribution.

This tax break was off the books for all of 2012 and then retroactively added in January of 2013 (too little too late). Those who took advantage of it in 2011, or before, will be glad it is back. Officially it is called a Qualified Charitable Distribution or QCD.

So, what is the difference between making a QCD directly to a charity or taking the money and then donating it to the charity personally? Let’s look at an example.

Let’s say Henry decides to withdraw the money first and then donate to a charity. If his required minimum distribution was $10,000, he would have to take the distribution and withhold taxes. For this article, let’s assume Henry must withhold 15% for federal tax and 5% for state tax, or $2,000 in taxes. That means he would get a check for $8,000. Henry would then deposit that check in his checking account and write out a personal check to his charity. Next year Henry would get to include the $8,000 as a deduction on his taxes. However, the deduction only reduces his taxes a fraction of the $8,000.

The other option is for Henry to donate the $10,000 directly to a charity. He doesn’t have to pay anything in taxes and his charity is benefited by the full $10,000. The decision seems to be fairly easy.

If you plan to donate money to a charity and you have to take a Required Minimum Distribution this year, give us a call so we can help you take full advantage of this reinstated tax law.

Tags: , , , , , , ,