Unexpected Retirement Expenses

Preparing for a successful retirement takes years of planning, saving, and dreaming about the years when you will no longer be working. When planning for retirement we recommend you think about the amount of monthly income you need to maintain your lifestyle.

However, there are some expenses you may not think of before retiring.

1. Home Repairs: Before retiring take inventory of the age of your house. What are some of the items that may need to be updated? Then come up with a plan for how to have cash on hand to pay for each of those repairs.

Some of the most expensive items include your home’s: HVAC, roof, pipes, septic system, deck, siding, and plumbing.

Planning for home repairs can alleviate a lot of financial burden by either repairing items before retirement or by creating a reserve home repair fund, in addition to an emergency fund.

2. Healthcare Costs: Did you know the average couple will spend about $250,000 on healthcare during their retirement? Even if you believe you will not spend that much on healthcare, it is a good idea to plan for the unexpected, especially with the rising cost of healthcare.

Although Medicare is available at the age of 65, it does not cover all medical expenses. There are additional premiums and expenses for prescription coverage. Dental and vision insurance is not covered by Medicare, so private insurance will be needed if you would like this coverage.

If you are planning to retire before the age of 65, be sure to know how much the cost of private healthcare will be. The premiums are a lot more than individuals think.

3. Purchasing Power: The average price of a movie ticket in 1974 was $2.00. Fast-forward to 2015, the average price was $8.50! That is a 3.4 percent increase in cost per year and a good example of the power of inflation.

Inflation is hard to see as it happens slowly over time, yet it is crucial to plan for in retirement.

• If you retired today with a monthly income of $3,000 and an inflation rate of 3 percent, in the year 2040 you would need about $6,000 per month to maintain the same standard of living.

• Outpacing inflation with a risk appropriate, diversified portfolio can help to minimize the risk of purchasing power.

4. Spending too much early on in retirement: Yay! You made it to retirement. You’ll have more free time, which often means spending more money. It might be spent on visiting loved ones, traveling, golfing, lunching, or starting new hobbies.

Before you retire, make sure to have a realistic amount of money you will spend each month. Make sure to include your day to day expenses, healthcare costs, taxes, home repairs, utilities, travel expenses, and any other items that may be important to you.

5. Longevity: If you know the exact day you will pass away, planning for retirement is easy. That’s not the way life goes. If we plan based solely on previous generations’ life spans, we may not plan for a long enough lifespan.

Planning beyond age 90 is a more conservative plan. Although you may need to reduce your monthly income, you will have a well-rounded plan that will help your income last for your lifetime.

Planning for retirement can be a daunting task, yet with the right team on your side you can be set up for success and live out the retirement of your dreams.

How Long Will You Live?

Financial planning would be a lot easier if we knew exactly how long each of us was going to live. Then you theoretically could spend your last dime on the day that you die, as the old adage goes. As it is, we are left to try to make certain plans around uncertain events.

JP Morgan created a retirement guide that shows your life expectancy probability at age 65. This may provide a little guidance as you plan for the future. No one knows for sure how much time they have to live, and there are a multitude of factors that contribute to your longevity, such as health habits and family history.

More than anything, these life expectancy statistics may help you from falling into the trap of thinking you will die early, when in fact you may have many wonderful years ahead of you. For example a 65-year-old woman has a 33 percent chance that she will live to the age of 90. Those are pretty good odds. Sorry men, your prognosis isn’t quite as good, but a 65-year-old man still has a 21 percent chance of living to the age of 90. A couple, where both are 65 years old, has a whopping 73 percent chance that one of them will live to the age of 90.

This increased longevity in large part is due to better health habits and improved health care, among other factors. These statistics are very generic, but they may cause you to rethink your retirement plan. It is better to plan to live a long life and save too much money, rather than spending all of your money and living too long. Statistics show that more people are afraid of running out of money than dying.

Of course there is always a balancing act between living the lifestyle you want in retirement and making your money last for your full retirement—counsel with a competent retirement planner to make sure that you are either saving enough for retirement or that your spending plan won’t leave your financial well dry.

You may or may not want to know how long you may live, but it is always a good practice to plan for best and worst case possibilities.

Long to live

Top Concern for Small Business Owners: Rising Health Insurance Costs

A recent study by the National Federation of Independent Business ranked “Cost of Health Insurance” the number one concern for small business owners.1 This comes as no surprise as there has been much uncertainty over the impact of the Affordable Care Act, AKA “ObamaCare.”

The Wall Street Journal reports that “while ObamaCare won’t take full effect until 2014, health insurance premiums in the individual market are already rising, and not just because of routine increases in medical costs. Insurers are adjusting premiums now in anticipation of the guaranteed-issue and community-rating mandates starting next year.”2 The largest impact will be for individual coverage, where health care costs in Utah are expected to increase somewhere between 65% and 100%.3 Small employers are also expected to feel a disparate impact. Large employers will be impacted the least.

Whether you supply health insurance for your small business employees or you get alone with individual coverage, you can expect premiums to increase.

While understanding that costs will most likely increase, we also need to remember that one of the benefits of ObamaCare is that many small business owners, employees, and individuals can gain access to healthcare where they didn’t have access before.

For small business owners, there are specific rules governing how your business will be impacted next year based on the number of employees you have. For example, if you have less than 25 employees, you may actually qualify for a tax credit if you contribute 50 percent or more toward employee health insurance. Employers with 25-50 employees will have access to SHOP, the Small Business Health Options Program,
where employers can go to find coverage from a selection of providers in the marketplace. Open enrollment begins October 1, 2013.

It isn’t until you have 50 full-time equivalent employees or more that you may be subject to an “employer shared responsibility payment” beginning in 2014. It is important to understand how all of these rules may impact you. For greater detail please visit SBA.gov and IRS.gov and search for the Affordable Care Act.

So, what should you be doing as a small business owner? First, make sure you understand all of the changes and how they will impact you going forward. Then, if you feel like the cost of your insurance is increasing dramatically, shop around. Smedley Financial Services has access to individual and small business health insurance plans. We can give you a second opinion to see if you can save money or if there is a different type of plan that is more suited to your business structure.

There are so many changes happening in health care that it is hard to keep up. However, with a little research and some expert advice you can remove some of the uncertainty in your life.

1. “Uncertainty Dominates Top 5 Small Business Concerns,” National Federation of Independent Business, http://www.nfib.com/research-foundation/priorities.
2. Merrill Mathews and Mark E. Litow, “ObamaCare’s Health Insurance Sticker Shock,” Wall Street Journal, January 13, 2013.
3. Merrill Mathews and Mark E. Litow, “ObamaCare’s Health Insurance Sticker Shock,” Wall Street Journal, January 13, 2013.