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emotional investing

Are you feeling anxious about the market?

By | 2019, Money Matters, Newsletter | No Comments

If your answer is yes, you are not alone. We are emotional creatures. When things get rocky, or we perceive they are rocky, we can make decisions that feel good at the time, but in the long run, are not in our best interest. Let me share an example you may relate too.

You have worked hard and saved diligently for years, and finally, you have reached your financial goal, be it: saving for retirement, building a nest egg for a future purchase, or another purpose altogether. You feel a sense of relief – I did it! Once you reach this target number, every emotion you have regarding the market going forward may be tied to that target number.

How do you feel when you see that number going down? For some, the feeling is panic! All we can think is, “It took me forever to get to this point and I cannot afford to lose anything.” This is an emotional response. You have abandoned future perspective and are focusing only on the here and now. We often see this response to market volatility when someone is getting close to retiring or has retired. Suddenly, our long-term perspective is tomorrow afternoon. We have completely discounted the value of market performance over time.

I realize you may not enjoy looking at charts but bear with me for just a minute. Look at the two charts below. How do you feel about the chart on the left? How do you feel about the chart on the right? Believe it or not, the chart on the left is merely a subsection, representing a 90-day period, from the chart on the right, which illustrates a 5-year period. The difference is when viewing volatility over a longer time period it feels more comfortable than it does when viewed in a short period of time.

It is so easy to adopt a myopic view when emotionally, we feel like we should flee to safety. What the two charts teach us is that volatility is subjective and can be controlled by how often we look at our account balance. Now, look at the next two charts showing the exact 5-year period. The chart of the left represents the market value at the end of each quarter. The chart the right represents the market value each day. My guess is you feel better about the smoother chart to the left.

Managing your emotions during times of increased market volatility is challenging but can be done. Here are a few tips to help you through the volatile times.

1) Try to review your account no more than quarterly.

2) When you hear concerning news in the media remember; their job is to sell headlines and stories not to give personalized investment advice to you.

3) If you are feeling concerned, reach out to us. That is why we are here.

We have information regarding your financial situation, your financial plan, your investments, and the markets. We will give you advice and perspective that will help you stay on track.

*The illustrations are for educational purposes and are not indicative of an actual investment return. The Standard and Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) index is often considered to represent the U.S. stock market. Investments cannot be made directly into an index. Historical performance does not guarantee future results.

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Is Your Brain Risking Your Financial Success?

By | 2019, Newsletter | No Comments

The world is full of information, yet our brains are only capable of processing a certain amount. If we had to analyze every aspect of every situation or decision, we would never get anything done. In order to cope, our brains have created shortcuts to help us make sense of things. These cognitive shortcuts – known as heuristics – are rules of thumb or educated guesses. In many cases, being approximately right is good enough. However, there are times when these shortcuts are not good. Recognizing when they are creeping into our decision-making will help us determine if they are helpful or hurtful in our current situation. This is critical when it comes to your money.

Overconfidence

While confidence is good, overconfidence exaggerates our abilities and can cause us to underestimate the risk of being wrong. For example, you may pick a stock that is growing. If the stock price continues to go up, you conclude that you have a good strategy or a natural talent. However, when the stock plummets, you distance yourself from the truth, believing it was just bad luck. An overconfident person may even repeat the same mistake over and over again.

Framing

When we have already made up our minds, we place our existing perspective on all new information that comes our way. For example, expecting a drop in the stock market, you put a negative spin on any good news. People who frame eventually get a big surprise when they find out the cost of being wrong.

Anchoring

Every one of us has experiences that form our opinions. When we anchor ourselves to these opinions, we ignore anything that doesn’t fit our views. If you lost money investing in a recession, you might conclude that the stock market is too risky. Even when presented with a better perspective of its potential growth, you may still feel like there is too much risk.

Herding

Have you ever found yourself doing something you would not do on your own? Going along with what a larger group is doing, whether those actions are rational or not, even in the face of unfavorable outcomes is known as herding. You hear that investors are selling, so you sell, or you hear they are buying, so you buy more without considering how it impacts your financial plan.

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How Emotion Drives Your Money

By | 2019, Money Moxie, Newsletter | No Comments

Emotional Response

Financial advertisements make inflammatory statements such as “You cannot afford losses like those of the last recession” or “Making the wrong Social Security decision can cost you thousands.” These advertisers want to make us feel that we need to make changes without considering the reality of our situation.

Everything we hear or see causes an emotional reaction; good or bad. Information we hear or see hits the amygdala, the center of emotion in our brain within 12 milliseconds.

Logical Response

It takes 40 milliseconds for the same information to hit the logical part of our brain, the cortex.

By that time our emotions have hijacked our brain, and we cannot think straight. There literally is no time for rational thinking. Our minds were made up before we even realized what was happening.

Finding a Solution

Next time you find your logic being hijacked by emotion, take a step back. Think to yourself: “What if the situation I am fearing does not happen?” “What if the opposite happens and things are better than I think?”

Your financial plan is the tool we use to prepare you for market volatility and prevent emotional decisions from sidetracking you from your important financial goals. If you do not have a plan or have not recently reviewed your plan, I invite you to meet with one of our financial advisors.

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