Happy New Year

By January 1, 20202020, Money Matters, Newsletter

Making 2020 Count Financially 

I’m not one to harp on New Year’s Resolutions, but I do want to make sure you are aware of opportunities that will help you reach your financial goals. I thought I would share a couple of tips you may want to think about, possibly share with your friends and family, and implement for yourself.

Define your goals

From year-to-year, the top investments are going to rotate. We are often asked, “What should I invest in?” A better question may be, “What am I investing for?”  Defining a goal and then matching your investment strategy to that goal will help you stay on track. Keeping your focus on the goal rather than day-to-day movement in the market will help you manage the emotional side of investing. This is critical when market volatility increases.

Put investing on autopilot

We find that over time investors who have a systematic approach to saving are more consistent in their efforts. Waiting until the end of the week, the month, or the year before deciding to put money aside can diminish the urgency of saving and your ability to reach a goal. The 401(k) is a wonderful example; every pay cycle money goes directly into an investment for the future – automatically. Once you make the initial decision to contribute, no further action is required. The same can be done in an account outside of your retirement plan.

Increase contributions for 2020

If you are not making a maximum contribution to your 401(k), consider increasing the amount you will contribute this year, even if it’s a small increase. The limit for 2020 increased to $19,500. Often employees contribute only enough to get the employer’s full matching contribution – which is great! However, with fewer employers offering pension plans, the burden to save for retirement falls to the employees. Saving smaller amounts early on makes a significant difference in how much you will have when you get to retirement. If your employer doesn’t offer a 401(k), consider putting away up to $6,000 in an IRA or Roth IRA.

Make up for lost time

For anyone who will be 50 or older this year – there is at least one advantage – you can make up for lost time. The catch-up provision allows you to sock away additional money for the future. The 401(k) catch-up limit increased in 2020 to $6,500. For IRA and Roth IRA, the catch-up remains at $1,000.

Simplify your portfolio

It is not unusual to have several jobs throughout the course of your career. That being said, having multiple plans with past employers can be cumbersome and difficult to monitor. Consider consolidating these plans, making it more effective to track your investments, and determine if they are on track to help you reach your goals. 

We wish you a prosperous New Year!

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